Eczema/Dermatitis

It’s an inflammatory, autoimmune condition that is caused by a compromised moisture barrier, a distorted inflammatory/immune response in the skin, and unbalanced bacterial colonization. It’s sometimes called the “itch that rashes” because flare-ups
oftentimes start with an itch that, after scratching or irritation, develops into a rash, blisters, or scabs.

Folks with eczema tend to experience dry, irritated, and itchy skin. Many who have had eczema for a long time have thick, darkened skin where they tend to get the most patches. Their skin tends to be more sensitive to certain things like fragrances, particular fabrics, temperature changes, etc. Since good things come in threes 🙃 having Atopic Dermatitis (most common form of eczema) also makes you more likely to have asthma and other allergies, and vice versa. This is called the “atopic triad,” so if you’re wondering what those rashes you get are, and you have allergies and asthma, it might be eczema! How fun 🤧

 

That’s my Type

Types of Eczema

Atopic Dermatitis: This is the most common type of eczema - over 18 million people in the US have this. It’s chronic, meaning it never really goes away, and is considered a more severe form of eczema. It’s most commonly seen on legs, arms, and cheeks, but can appear all over the body. Folks with AD often develop other kinds of dermatitis as well (others listed below!) *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)*

Hand Dermatitis: Hand Dermatitis gets its name because it primarily affects hands, but it often looks and feels a lot like some of these other types of eczema. If you use cleaning products, soaps, dyes, fragrances, etc. frequently, you’re more prone to get this kind of eczema. If your hands tend to get cracked, irritated, or inflamed during changing seasons, particularly in the winter when you’re washing your hands more frequently, this might be you.  *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)* Contact Dermatitis: Contact dermatitis happens when your skin comes into contact with something you’re allergic to. CD can be painful, itchy, and appear as either dark brown/purple (if you have darker skin) sometimes scaly patches, red patches (if you have lighter skin) or hives. Super important: CD can take up to 96 hours after contact to appear, and often doesn’t appear the first time you come into contact with whatever it is you’re allergic to. This is because the first time your body comes into contact with it, your immune system sometimes only files it for memory, and remembers to complain about it and give you a rash after your second or later exposure. Excellent! *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)* Stasis Dermatitis: Stasis Dermatitis typically occurs in the lower legs due to fluid buildup. Basically, vein damage and/or staying still for long periods of time causes body fluids to stay in the legs because fluids/blood are not circulating correctly. This fluid can then leak through the layers of your skin, causing swelling, irritation, and redness. Over time, SD can cause varicose veins, and scarring or thickened skin on legs. Folks with SD also more easily develop contact dermatitis. *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)*

Nummular Dermatitis: Nummular Dermatitis is sort of unique because it’s not as chronic (it’s normally not a long-term issue) and it looks more coin-shaped/spotty than other forms of eczema. These coin-shaped flare-ups ooze fluid or crust over. Those who have ND usually get it after damage to the skin (like a bug bite), an allergic reaction or reaction to inflammation, during the winter, or because of poor blood flow in the legs. *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)*
Neurodermatitis: Neurodermatitis is different from other forms because it’s actually caused by irritated nerve endings rather than differences in skin function. The cause of Neurodermatitis is still not well understood, but it can be triggered by a bug bite, stress, or a skin allergy. Irritated nerve endings signal to your brain that you’re itchy, even if you have no reason to be, and scratching/rubbing causes the affected area to become thick and leathery. Oftentimes, the patch looks very isolated. Neurodermatitis likes to partner up with and appear alongside other types of eczema or psoriasis. *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)*
Dyshidrotic Dermatitis: This type of eczema is twice as common in women as in men 😔and looks like fluid filled blisters on the soles of the feet, palms of the hands and/or the fingers. Severe itching, bleeding, and peeling are common with DD. DD tends to pop up like a toxic ex during spring allergy season. If you have contact or atopic dermatitis, or hay fever, you’re more likely to experience this kind of eczema. Cute! *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)

Pullout quote example. eople with eczema have a compromised skin moisture barrier, which basically means that some of the molecules (ceramides, filaggrin, sphingolipids) that help to hold in moisture are either not working, or absent. Mixing with % and 1293

Symptoms/Causes - How? What? Where?
People with eczema have a compromised skin moisture barrier, which basically means that some of the molecules (ceramides, filaggrin, sphingolipids) that help to hold in moisture are either not working, or absent. This is why dry skin is a major symptom of eczema - moisture more easily leaves the skin. Your moisture barrier also helps keep bad things out, so a not-so-great moisture barrier also means that more bacteria are able to colonize on and irritate your skin. Lastly, folks with eczema often have a hyperactive inflammatory immune response, meaning their skin is super sensitive to and overreacts when it comes in contact with everyday stuff (pollen, fragrance, soap, etc.). This is what makes your skin feel itchy, inflamed and irritated. Your skin’s inflammatory response also further disrupts your moisture barrier, which increases dryness, and makes your skin more vulnerable to irritants. Have you ever blocked your own blessings? That’s basically your skin when you have eczema - it gets into a nasty cycle that makes dryness, inflammation, and irritation worse and worse.
All types of eczema are usually characterized by itchy, inflamed, and irritated skin. Skin is often discolored (red, brown, or purple), painful, and rough. Eczema flare-ups can also appear as blistered, scabbed, or flaky skin. Eczema patches that are more chronic, or that have been around for longer are often thickened
Atopic Dermatitis: AD is the most common type of eczema, and it’s chronic, meaning it tends to stick around and never totally disappear. AD normally appears on the cheeks, arms and legs, but can be anywhere on the body. Look for super itchy, dry, scaly skin and/or crusty, oozing sores. AD can also look and feel like sensitive, inflamed, swollen, darkened patches that may get leathery and scaly over time.


“This is a quote from UGC that sits here, in two or three lines”
Serena Patel
“This is a quote from UGC that sits here, in two or three lines”
Serena Patel
 

How? What? Where?

Types of Eczema

Atopic Dermatitis: This is the most common type of eczema - over 18 million people in the US have this. It’s chronic, meaning it never really goes away, and is considered a more severe form of eczema. It’s most commonly seen on legs, arms, and cheeks, but can appear all over the body. Folks with AD often develop other kinds of dermatitis as well (others listed below!) *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)*

Hand Dermatitis: Hand Dermatitis gets its name because it primarily affects hands, but it often looks and feels a lot like some of these other types of eczema. If you use cleaning products, soaps, dyes, fragrances, etc. frequently, you’re more prone to get this kind of eczema. If your hands tend to get cracked, irritated, or inflamed during changing seasons, particularly in the winter when you’re washing your hands more frequently, this might be you.  *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)* Contact Dermatitis: Contact dermatitis happens when your skin comes into contact with something you’re allergic to. CD can be painful, itchy, and appear as either dark brown/purple (if you have darker skin) sometimes scaly patches, red patches (if you have lighter skin) or hives. Super important: CD can take up to 96 hours after contact to appear, and often doesn’t appear the first time you come into contact with whatever it is you’re allergic to. This is because the first time your body comes into contact with it, your immune system sometimes only files it for memory, and remembers to complain about it and give you a rash after your second or later exposure. Excellent! *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)* Stasis Dermatitis: Stasis Dermatitis typically occurs in the lower legs due to fluid buildup. Basically, vein damage and/or staying still for long periods of time causes body fluids to stay in the legs because fluids/blood are not circulating correctly. This fluid can then leak through the layers of your skin, causing swelling, irritation, and redness. Over time, SD can cause varicose veins, and scarring or thickened skin on legs. Folks with SD also more easily develop contact dermatitis. *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)*

Nummular Dermatitis: Nummular Dermatitis is sort of unique because it’s not as chronic (it’s normally not a long-term issue) and it looks more coin-shaped/spotty than other forms of eczema. These coin-shaped flare-ups ooze fluid or crust over. Those who have ND usually get it after damage to the skin (like a bug bite), an allergic reaction or reaction to inflammation, during the winter, or because of poor blood flow in the legs. *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)*
Neurodermatitis: Neurodermatitis is different from other forms because it’s actually caused by irritated nerve endings rather than differences in skin function. The cause of Neurodermatitis is still not well understood, but it can be triggered by a bug bite, stress, or a skin allergy. Irritated nerve endings signal to your brain that you’re itchy, even if you have no reason to be, and scratching/rubbing causes the affected area to become thick and leathery. Oftentimes, the patch looks very isolated. Neurodermatitis likes to partner up with and appear alongside other types of eczema or psoriasis. *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)*
Dyshidrotic Dermatitis: This type of eczema is twice as common in women as in men 😔and looks like fluid filled blisters on the soles of the feet, palms of the hands and/or the fingers. Severe itching, bleeding, and peeling are common with DD. DD tends to pop up like a toxic ex during spring allergy season. If you have contact or atopic dermatitis, or hay fever, you’re more likely to experience this kind of eczema. Cute! *link to symptoms below (see AD-specific symptoms)

Pullout quote example. eople with eczema have a compromised skin moisture barrier, which basically means that some of the molecules (ceramides, filaggrin, sphingolipids) that help to hold in moisture are either not working, or absent. Mixing with % and 1293

Symptoms/Causes - How? What? Where?
People with eczema have a compromised skin moisture barrier, which basically means that some of the molecules (ceramides, filaggrin, sphingolipids) that help to hold in moisture are either not working, or absent. This is why dry skin is a major symptom of eczema - moisture more easily leaves the skin. Your moisture barrier also helps keep bad things out, so a not-so-great moisture barrier also means that more bacteria are able to colonize on and irritate your skin. Lastly, folks with eczema often have a hyperactive inflammatory immune response, meaning their skin is super sensitive to and overreacts when it comes in contact with everyday stuff (pollen, fragrance, soap, etc.). This is what makes your skin feel itchy, inflamed and irritated. Your skin’s inflammatory response also further disrupts your moisture barrier, which increases dryness, and makes your skin more vulnerable to irritants. Have you ever blocked your own blessings? That’s basically your skin when you have eczema - it gets into a nasty cycle that makes dryness, inflammation, and irritation worse and worse.
All types of eczema are usually characterized by itchy, inflamed, and irritated skin. Skin is often discolored (red, brown, or purple), painful, and rough. Eczema flare-ups can also appear as blistered, scabbed, or flaky skin. Eczema patches that are more chronic, or that have been around for longer are often thickened
Atopic Dermatitis: AD is the most common type of eczema, and it’s chronic, meaning it tends to stick around and never totally disappear. AD normally appears on the cheeks, arms and legs, but can be anywhere on the body. Look for super itchy, dry, scaly skin and/or crusty, oozing sores. AD can also look and feel like sensitive, inflamed, swollen, darkened patches that may get leathery and scaly over time.

“This is a quote from UGC that sits here, in two or three lines”
Serena Patel
“This is a quote from UGC that sits here, in two or three lines”
Serena Patel

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